Habagat (2012) Flood in Marikina City, Metro Manila

7 August 2012


The 2012 Metro Manila Flooding commonly known to locals as Habagat 2012 was an eight-day period of massive rain and thunderstorms in early August of 2012. The storm was a strong movement of the southwest monsoon caused by the pull of Typhoon Gener (international name, Saola) from August 1-3, 2012 (Sawada and Kuroishi, 2015). It was also strengthened by Typhoon Haikui, although located hundreds of kilometers away from the Philippines and was taking its toll on China.

Habagat rains captured by Doppler radar as seen in the NOAH website. Screenshot taken at 7 am on August 7, 2012. (Source: Rappler)

Habagat rains captured by Doppler radar as seen in the NOAH website. Screenshot taken at 7 am on August 7, 2012. (Source: Rappler)

Consequent flood during extreme rain is already common in the metro. At seven in the evening of August 8, the Marikina River, also known as the Metro Manila’s major river basin, again reached its deadly level of 19 meters, imposing a serious threat to people in Marikina and its adjacent towns. There was a significant water level increase of 9.49m because of the heavy and continuous rainfall.

Marikina residents evacuate using a garbage truck to remain safe from the floods. (Source: http://bestpinoyradio.blogspot.com/2012/08/floods-brought-by-habagat-or-low.html)

Marikina residents evacuate using a garbage truck to remain safe from the floods. (Source: http://bestpinoyradio.blogspot.com/2012/08/floods-brought-by-habagat-or-low.html)

However, warnings through social media posts (Twitter) were disseminated by the Department of Science and Technology – Project NOAH early morning of August 9. Real- time tweets and updates about the fast rising water level of Marikina River were picked-up by media companies’ online news portals. Advisories and warnings were immediately broadcasted on air.

Media groups like Rappler monitored the weather and flooding through the tools in the NOAH website (noah.dost.gov.ph) (Source: Rappler)

Media groups like Rappler monitored the weather and flooding through the tools in the NOAH website (noah.dost.gov.ph) (Source: Rappler)

People were warned beforehand about the onslaught of the dangerous impending floods. Imperative evacuations were imposed on people in Marikina especially those residents near the river. As a result, out of 424, 150 people, there was no recorded casualty in Marikina.

Sto. Domingo church parish priests and the management opened their doors to people who were forced to evacuate and was seeking shelter from the rain, the floods, and the cold. [http://www.prolife.org.ph/?p=823]

Sto. Domingo church parish priests and the management opened their doors to people who were forced to evacuate and was seeking shelter from the rain, the floods, and the cold. [http://www.prolife.org.ph/?p=823]


GMA News Online. (2012). Project NOAH Alerts: August 9, 2012 – Marikina River water level rising fast. GMA Network.
http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/268916/news/metro/project-noah-alerts-august-9-2012-marikina-river-water-level-rising-fast#sthash.boDzEWFk.dpuf

Lagmay, A.M.F, Bagtasa, G., David, C.P., Crisologo, I., Racoma, B.A. (2014). Volcanoes magnify Metro Manila’s southwest monsoon rains and lethal floods. NOAH Open File Reports, (2): 35-45. ISSN 2362-7409.
http://blog.noah.dost.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/vol2_no6.pdf

Sawada, Y. and Kuroishi, Y. (2015). How does a Natural Disaster Affect People’s Preference? An Investitation of a Large Scale Flood in the Philippines using the Convex Time Budget Experiments.
http://www3.grips.ac.jp/~esp/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/2015-Hayami_Sawada-CTBinthephilippinesJan20152.pdf

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